instagram arrow-down
The Kansas Leadership Center Journal

Menu

Categories

Recent Posts

Archives

Who’s running for office in the Nov. 6, 2018, general election in Kansas? Find out more about state and legislative candidates here

Check your voter registration information and find your polling place here.

Information About State and Legislative Candidates in Kansas

The Journal asked all candidates for state and legislative offices in the Nov. 6 general election to complete a three question survey. Below you’ll find a list that includes the name of each candidate running in a contested race, a link to their Facebook page or website if it exists, and their survey responses, if they were received. There is a also a link to a map showing the boundaries for each legislative district.

The Journal has also included survey responses from several candidates running in uncontested races.

(Click to Learn More)

Contested Races


Governor/Lt.Governor
Secretary of State
Attorney General
State Treasurer
Insurance Commissioner
District 13, Kansas Senate
District 2, Kansas House
District 3, Kansas House
District 4, Kansas House
District 5, Kansas House
District 8, Kansas House
District 14, Kansas House
District 15, Kansas House
District 16, Kansas House
District 17, Kansas House
District 18, Kansas House
District 19, Kansas House
District 20, Kansas House
District 23, Kansas House
District 25, Kansas House
District 26, Kansas House
District 27, Kansas House
District 28, Kansas House
District 29, Kansas House
District 30, Kansas House
District 33, Kansas House
District 36, Kansas House
District 38, Kansas House
District 39, Kansas House
District 40, Kansas House
District 41, Kansas House
District 42, Kansas House
District 43, Kansas House
District 45, Kansas House
District 47, Kansas House
District 48, Kansas House
District 49, Kansas House
District 50, Kansas House
District 52, Kansas House
District 54, Kansas House
District 56, Kansas House
District 59, Kansas House
District 62, Kansas House
District 66, Kansas House
District 67, Kansas House
District 69, Kansas House
District 70, Kansas House
District 72, Kansas House
District 78, Kansas House
District 79, Kansas House
District 81, Kansas House
District 82, Kansas House
District 83, Kansas House
District 85, Kansas House
District 86, Kansas House
District 91, Kansas House
District 93, Kansas House
District 94, Kansas House
District 97, Kansas House
District 98, Kansas House
District 99, Kansas House
District 100, Kansas House
District 107, Kansas House
District 110, Kansas House
District 111, Kansas House
District 113, Kansas House
District 114, Kansas House
District 120, Kansas House
District 121, Kansas House
District 123, Kansas House

Candidates in Uncontested Races Who Completed Survey

District 13, Kansas House
District 68, Kansas House
District 71, Kansas House
District 88, Kansas House

Governor/Lt. Governor

Laura Kelly/Lynn Rogers (Democratic)

Kris Kobach/Wink Hartman (Republican)

Jeff Caldwell/Mary Gerlt (Libertarian)

Rick Kloos/Nathaniel Kloos (independent)

Greg Orman/John Doll (independent)

Back to Top

Secretary of State

Brian “BAM” McClendon (Democratic)
Scott Schwab (Republican)
Rob Hodgkinson (Libertarian)

Schwab’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

My name is Scott Schwab. I’m a lifelong Kansan from Great Bend and graduate of Fort Hays State University. My career has taken me from small business owner to National Sales Trainer for a Fortune 50. As Chair of the House Elections Committee, I worked to secure our elections so every Kansan could have trusted results. My most important role is being a husband and dad. My wife, Michele, and I currently live in Olathe with our children.  I’m running for Secretary of State to ensure our elections are safe and secure, our business filings are streamlined so it’s easy to do business in Kansas, and our county clerks have the resources they need to do their jobs effectively and efficiently. With over a decade of both private sector and public policy experience, I’m prepared to lead the office with professionalism and excellence – ensuring a better Kansas for future generations.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

I love Kansas. From growing up in Great Bend, hunting the fields by Garden City, my college career at Fort Hays State, to raising my family in Olathe: this state has been very good to us. I’ve spent the last decade and a half serving this state so our kids will want to spend their lives here as well. As Secretary of State, we will run the office with professionalism and excellence, ensuring safe and secure elections for generations to come.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

I’ve had the honor to live and work in both rural and urban areas of Kansas. I understand the needs of Kansans statewide. I’m also the only candidate in this race with over a decade of experienced leadership in both the private sector and public policy. As Secretary of State, I’ll work with our county clerks, not against them — ensuring they have the resources they need to conduct secure elections. I’ll streamline our business filing system and provide cutting edge IT security – delivering steady, dependable results every Kansan can trust. With my leadership experience in the business industry, I’ll bring innovation to the business and IT departments, streamlining business filings so it’s easier to do business in Kansas statewide and further securing our elections with cutting edge IT security.  I’ll deliver experienced leadership, the Kansas way.

Hodgkinson’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

Rob Hodgkinson I am your independent voice in this race as there is a republican, a democrat and there’s me. I am running to be your next secretary of state because I believe I have the best, most well-rounded resume of the 3 of us running. I have experience in three area that will really help **restore** the credibility to the office of Kansas secretary of state that has been lost in the last 8 years. I have IT experience, **kinda important in this day and age of computers and voting – isn’t it? My IT experience comes from an “enterprise perspective as I was responsible for a companies complete IT needs. I built the servers, I built the desktops, I helped the CEO and I helped the people in the plant, and everyone in-between. I have small business experience as I was a partner in a small remodeling business that tripled our business in the recession years and I am a still a small businessman today – working in real estate **this gives me a “customer” perspective of how the Secretary of state handles business filings. I have election experience **I have been fighting for fair and safe elections for 13 years now from a “third party” OUTSIDER perspective. I was part of a study group in 2009 by former SOS Ron Thornburgh named “the future of Kansas elections”. You may remember the special election law that was changed early 2017 due to Pompeo bailing on Kansas. I was the catalyst to make that change to allow ALL recognized political parties in any special elections and that lowered the requirements for independents to run via signatures. Neither of the other two candidates in this race can claim experience in ALL THREE of these areas. IT, small business, elections.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

By making transparency every day policy. And by making elections accessible, accountable and secure. I see this in 3 parts for elections – Voter registration, Voter participation and Numbers of candidates. Voter registration needs to be much simpler/easier than in the past Voter participation needs to increase Candidates: I love the fact we have 5 candidates in the Governor’s race this year – I will work to have many candidates all the way through the ballot. When we have many candidates, rather than throwing mud & being negative, we get the chance to hear about issues. Strengthen the new regulations for audits in elections (effective 1/2019). The current wording of the audit requirements leaves a lot of wiggle room as to how they will be done. Ending Crosscheck, this program is faulty and not used by all 50 states making its intended purpose useless . Lobbying to have the election commissioner of the 4 big counties election offices locally elected rather than being appointed by the Secretary of State. Updating the KSSoS website, today it is not mobile friendly, the navigation is awkward, and is hard to read due too much legal language being used rather than plain tone it should use. I believe the KSSoS can do a similar thing to what the State Treasurer does with the 529 college savings plans, that is to make public announcements about voting: Here is how you register to vote, here are the important dates, remember that there is an early voting option that can be used, etc.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

I plan to continue my efforts to create a better Kansas from an election standpoint. I will do so with the continued lobbying for individuals and the continuing encroachment of government. Because I am not part of the 2 big parties – I can focus on what is best for Kansans, not what is best for the 2 party system. Legislators from both big parties know me, listen to me and respect my efforts. I will continue to cultivate those relationships.

Back to Top

Attorney General

Sarah Swain (Democratic)
Derek Schmidt (Republican)

Schmidt’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

My name is Derek Schmidt. I have had the privilege of serving as attorney general for the past two terms and am running for a third term in this year’s elections. I would like to continue building on our strong record of consumer protection, support for public safety, expanding protections for seniors and children, providing professional legal services for the state and standing up against federal overreach.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

Roughly 10,000 Americans will turn age 65 each day for at least the next decade, so focusing on our capacity to respond to crimes against seniors is truly necessary. That’s why I have placed a special emphasis on combating elder abuse and strengthening the state’s capacity to respond to this demographic change and will continue to do so if I am reelected. I have worked with the Legislature to provide authority and resources in this area, and I would continue doing so. And as the 2017-18 president of the National Association of Attorneys General, I made combating elder abuse a national priority for all of the country’s state and territory attorneys general and worked cooperatively with federal authorities to strengthen our response to this growing problem.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

Recruiting and retaining talented individuals to work in the attorney general’s office to work on combating elder abuse – along with the many other duties and responsibilities of the office – is a responsibility that requires exercising leadership. I have worked to create an environment in the attorney general’s office that is attractive for talented individuals to ply their skills for the betterment of our state, and if re-elected I will work to continue setting standards within our office that foster the development of our talented workforce.

Back to Top

State Treasurer

Jake LaTurner (Republican)
Marci Francisco (Democratic)

Francisco’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

A 4th generation Kansan, I worked at the University of Kansas from 1976 to 2012. I served on the Lawrence City Commission from 1979-83, two of those years as Mayor. I was first elected to the Kansas Senate in 2004 and continue to represent the 2nd District in the Kansas Senate. I have been active in my community and the state as a member of the League of Women Voters and the Lawrence Advisory Board of Housing and Credit Counseling Inc. I served as treasurer of the Lawrence Preservation Alliance and currently chair the Endowment Committee for my congregation. My husband, a retired employee of the Kmart Distribution Center, live in Lawrence and restore properties to create affordable housing. With 14 years in the legislative branch of state government, I know how important it is to have an effective executive branch as well. I want to be the independent watchdog of the people’s money, providing information to the legislature and the public about the state’s financial health.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

By 2030 I would like to Kansas to have repaid much of our long term debt. Moreover, I’d like us to be in position to use our borrowing capacity to maintain our highways and other state infrastructure, and to purchase the remaining reservoir capacity from the federal government needed to meet our state and municipal water needs. I would like to see KPERS, our Kansas Public Employees Retirement System, well on its way to becoming solvent, a goal we should be able to reach by 2040. I would like every Kansas child to have educational savings plan funds set aside for them to use for vocational training, community college, or university tuition. Lastly, I would like more individuals and families in Kansas to be financially literate because Kansas will be financially secure only when individuals and families in our state are financially secure.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

I will lead from the Treasurer’s office by providing information about the fiscal health of our state, focusing not only on the current budget but also on long-term debt and obligations, and outlining a clear path for action. I would be an active participant on the KPERS Board and report on the costs of any delay in contributions by the state. I hope to work with the legislature to transform the Learning Quest program so contributions from the state for educational savings plans are available to every Kansas child. I would also work with the State Board of Education to develop a robust financially literacy program for public schools, visiting schools and community groups across the state to share those opportunities.

Back to Top

Insurance Commissioner

Nathaniel McLaughlin (Democratic)
Vicki Schmidt (Republican)

Schmidt’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

My name is Vicki Schmidt, I am both a lifelong Kansan and Republican. I was born and raised in Wichita and now live with my husband/high school sweetheart, Mike in Topeka. We have two sons and two grandsons. I have worked more than 40 years as a local pharmacist and serve the 20th Senate district, Shawnee and Wabaunsee Counties in the Kansas Senate. During my time in the Senate, I’ve spent 12 years on the Financial Institutions and Insurance Committee and served as chair of the Public Health and Welfare Committee. I became a pharmacist because I wanted to help people and I’m running for insurance commissioner for the same reason. I believe Kansans deserve an advocate when it comes to insurance. As a pharmacist, I deal with Kansans health insurance problems every day. That, combined with my experience in the Senate creates a unique skill set to be able to advocate on behalf of Kansans.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better  in 2030 as a result of your service?

The number one insurance issue brought to my attention by voters is the cost of insurance. Kansas is long overdue for a discussion about why insurance costs so much and what we can do to lower costs. I plan to facilitate that discussion and work with stakeholders to identify changes that could result in consumer savings. We also need to make sure Kansas is open for business and ensure regulations allow for a competitive market, so consumers have options. My other goal is to simply heighten the role of advocacy in the insurance department. I strongly believe Kansans deserve to have an advocate when it comes to insurance issues.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

The outcomes we need will be no small feat. I have a track record of bringing people together to work on solutions to the problems facing our state. First, we must listen to the people, learn what can be done and then act on their behalf. None of that is possible without strong partnerships with industry and in the legislature.

District 13, Kansas Senate

Map of District

Bryan Hoffman (Democratic)
Richard Hilderbrand (Republican)
Sam Habjan (Libertarian)

Hilderbrand’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

I am running for office because Kansas keeps spending more money than it collects in revenue.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

No debt, a stronger economy, less poverty, and a better tax structure for our state.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

Be a better servant for my constituents, so that I am a better leader in Topeka.

Hoffman’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

I am Bryan Hoffman. I am a lifelong resident of Southeast Kansas. My wife, Terri, and I have four children and we live on our family farm in Mulberry where we run a small cattle operation in our spare time. I have worked in construction my entire adult life. I am currently a job superintendent on road and bridge construction projects. I am a proud member of the Carpenters Local Union 311. Before that, I was a member of the Construction and General Laborers Local Union 319. I am running for Kansas Senate because I have seen how the reckless policies of the Brownback/Colyer administration have hurt our communities down here. We’ve lost jobs, our schools are underfunded, and our road projects have been delayed. We need a leader who will fight for what’s right for the people of southeast Kansas.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

I want all Kansas children to have opportunities to attend fully funded schools that are preparing them for a 21st century economy, this includes investments in education at all levels – from early childhood through higher education along with job training programs. I also want all Kansans to have access to affordable healthcare, regardless of where they live in the state. Finally, I want Kansans to have a fully funded and implemented transportation plan. This would bring safer roads and bridges, spur economic growth, and create good-paying jobs.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

I am just an average, hardworking Kansan. I’m not a career politician, and I won’t support policies that will continue to hurt our local economy. I will work closely with those who live in my district and listen to what they need and want before making a decision. Southeast Kansans are hardworking people and we need someone in Topeka fighting for what we need most – good jobs, good schools, and good roads.

 

District 2, Kansas House

Map of District

Adam J. Lusker Sr. (Democratic)
Kenneth Collins (Republican)

Back to Top

District 3, Kansas House

Map of District

Monica Murnan (Democratic)
Terry Calloway (Republican)

Murnan’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

Monica Murnan I am running for office to help continue the work on the 2017-2018 legislative session where the Brownback experiment was turned around.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

I hope that the Legislature will set policies that promote health, education and strong community infrastructures. Good policy allows communities to be creative and strong.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

By collaborating with others, education myself and digging into best practice.

Back to Top

District 4, Kansas House

Map of District

Lawrence Forbach (Democratic)
Trevor Jacobs (Republican)

Forbach’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

I’m Lawrence Forbach I want to help the Teachers and Students. Also the Seniors with the Medical Problems.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

A State that Teachers will want to Come and Teach and Stay.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

Work towards a Free Lunch Program for All Students. A Teacher Retirement State Wide Program. With the New Taxes from Hemp and Medicinal Cannabis Legalization.

Back to Top

District 5, Kansas House

Map of District

Lassey Murphy (Democratic)
Mark Samsel (Republican)

Back to Top

District 8, Kansas House

Map of District

Michele Lobitz (Democratic)
Chris Croft (Republican)

Back to Top

District 14, Kansas House

Map of District

Angela Justus Schweller (Democratic)
Charlotte Esau (Republican)

Back to Top

District 15, Kansas House

Map of District

Chris Haulmark (Democratic)
John Toplikar (Republican)

Back to Top

District 16, Kansas House

Map of District

Cindy Holscher (Democratic)
Susan “Sue” Huff (Republican)

Back to Top

District 17, Kansas House

Map of District

Laura Smith-Everett (Democratic)
Tom Cox (Republican)

Back to Top

District 18, Kansas House

Map of District

Cindy Neighbor (Democratic)
Eric Jenkins (Republican)

Jenkins’ Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

Eric A. Jenkins, Colonel (retired), United States Army Reserves and retired Federal manager with the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Possess a Bachelor of Arts in History and a Masters of Arts in Geography and I am a graduate of the United States Army War College. I have been an active citizen in my community with 3 years on the NW Advisory board to the Shawnee Mission Board of Education, 20 years on the Shawnee City Planning Commission, member of the Johnson County Charter Commission and 3 years as Shawnee City Councilman. I am a conservative who believes in the US Constitution as written, Judeo-Christian ethics, individual responsibility, sanctity of life and capitalism. I believe in minimizing government in restricting our lives and business, and place emphasis on working hard, building good strong families and being self sufficient to the maximum extent possible. I believe these principle which have created this incredible United States and Kansas are being eroded and damaged. I would be a part of the effort to re-establish our strengths and reduce our weaknesses.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

I want Kansas to budget within its means. Not simply raise and re-raise taxes to support an ever-growing group of government programs. I want to see a business friendly state that minimizes regulations to only the necessary ones, modify the school paradigm for Kansas to greatly expand our efforts to turn out graduates who are prepared for (1) higher education opportunities or (2) training in the trades and fully prepared to enter the workforce as a viable tradesman earning a living wage. I want to address the current lack of attention to our mentally ill. We need to address mental health with approaches which provide solutions and reintegration of people back into society and the workforce. Do everything possible to strengthen the most basic building block of our society-the family.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

I will seek out others in the State House of Representatives and our counterparts in the State Senate to build coalitions and concurrence on the issues I have addressed. As one of 125 it is not possible to effect change. It is necessary to provide leadership, establish direction and give impetus to move these issues forward. I have a lifetime of experiences in leadership, collaborative coordination and cooperation and intend to use those tools to move the agenda forward.

Back to Top

District 19, Kansas House

Map of District

Stephen Wyatt (Democratic)
Stephanie S. Clayton (Republican)

Clayton’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

My name is Stephanie Sawyer Clayton. I have been proud to serve as the State Representative of the 19th district since my election in 2012. I first ran for office because my young children started school, and I noticed improvements that needed to be made. The school crisis has nearly been resolved, and I look forward to the opportunity to return and complete my work stabilizing the government.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

I would like to see a state government that runs efficiently, and with stability. Kansas has undergone a great deal of turmoil, and we need a strong base on which to build, so that the children that we are educating now will excel in a dynamic global economy.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

As I have in the past, I like to work with unlikely allies. You never know who may agree with you on an issue, and conversation, especially listening, can create many avenues to success.

Wyatt’s Responses to The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

Stephen Wyatt. I am a progressive democrat running for the Kansas House district 19. I am running for office because I am unhappy with government and decided to attempt to make a difference as a candidate.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

I want Kansas schools to have a funding plan in place. I want residents to have access to medical coverage. I want Kansas to be a place of equality.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

I will work with everyone but will not betray my principles.

Back to Top

District 20, Kansas House

Map of District

Becky Barber (Democratic)
Jan H. Kessinger (Republican)

Kessinger’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

Jan Kessinger, State Representative House District 20. I first ran for office two years ago with a goal to return Kansas to fiscal solvency and responsibility; fully fund education; invest in the infrastructure; and restore local control. We have made great strides and we will continue that process. I am also a member of the Governor’s Council on Travel and Tourism as well as on the Board of Directors of the Johnson County Education Research Triangle.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

Kansas in 2030 will be a state with top-flight public education, including early childhood education, K-12 and higher education opportunities. Roads and other infrastructure will be leading edge and in good repair. The revenue model will be balanced and fair, with lower food sales taxes and wise spending of money in all departments.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

As a member of the Appropriations and Transportation/Public Safety budget committees, I will require justification of funding, with an eye to investing for a return on investment in society and the good for all Kansans. On the Commerce Committee, I will continue to seek businesses that create jobs and attract more people to the state. I also am involved in creativity in government and services in all areas.

Back to Top

District 25, Kansas House

Map of District

Rui Xu (Democratic)
Melissa Rooker (Republican)

Back to Top

District 26, Kansas House

Map of District

Deann Mitchell (Democratic)
Adam Thomas (Republican)

Back to Top

District 27, Kansas House

Map of District

Nicole Rome (Democratic)
Sean E. Tarwater (Republican)

Back to Top

District 28, Kansas House

Map of District

Brian Clausen (Democratic)
Kellie Warren (Republican)

Back to Top

District 29, Kansas House

Map of District

Brett Parker (Democratic)
James Todd (Republican)
Robert Firestone (Libertarian)

Back to Top

District 30 Kansas House

Map of District

Brandon Woodard (Democratic)
Wendy Bingesser (Republican)

Woodard’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

My name is Brandon Woodard and I’m running for the Kansas House of Representatives to represent district 30, which includes Lenexa and Olathe. I’m a lifelong Kansan and career fundraising professional running to restore our state’s commitment to public education, fairer taxes, and affordable healthcare for all Kansans.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

I believe that investments in higher education will make a meaningful difference for an entire generation of Kansas students, limiting their student debt load from attending our vocational and technical schools, community colleges, or four-year universities. I hope that constitutionally funding our public K-12 schools means that the next generation of Kansas students will be prepared to take on our state and our country’s most pressing issues in 2030 and beyond.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

I was inspired to run by the womens bipartisan coalition that partially repealed the Brownback tax plan.When I’m in Topeka, I’ll work with Democrats and Republicans to address our state’s most pressing issues. I’ll be a transparent lawmaker, respond to constituents regardless of their opinion, and be a voice for all in the 30th District.

Back to Top

District 33, Kansas House

Map of District

Tom Burroughs (Democratic)
Jason Conley (Libertarian)

Back to Top

District 36, Kansas House

Map of District

Kathy Wolfe Moore (Democratic)
Chiquita Coggs (Republican)

Coggs’ Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

My name is Chiquita Coggs. I was born, raised, graduated from high school, married, and had my children in Wyandotte County. Even though I left for a portion of my life, Kansas is still home. As a Kansas citizen I believe it is my civic responsibility to play an active role in community and government. We live in a nation and a state of self-governance, a government by the people and for the people. Citizens should be aware of how they are governed and be willing to play an active role in that governance, if possible. I have reached a stage in my life when it is possible for me to play an active role and I am prepared to do that. Some legislation in recent years has been contrary to the best interests of Kansans. There are many people in my district and in the state that share my beliefs and values. It is because of those beliefs and values that I am willing to take an active role in helping to bring about positive change in taxation, education, healthcare, family, and government spending, as well as other important issues facing our state.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

A legislator is responsible for understanding and acting on more than one issue on behalf of its citizens; however, education is my passion. Without an educated citizenry, government by the people will fail. I believe our children are entitled to an education in which our schools are held accountable for that education. All children who are capable of doing so should graduate able to read, write, and do simple math. Our future depends on them. Graduating students who cannot read or write or do simple arithmetic is not educating; it is babysitting. It is my desire to have a positive effect on the education of our children which, in turn, would leave Kansas better off in 2030 as a result of my service. Just as I hope to protect our citizenry through the education of our children, I also hope to be part of protecting other vulnerable segments of our society, our unborn children, our senior citizens, and our poor. I believe there are alternatives to abortion that will help expecting parents to choose a different option. Adoption is one way to provide a loving home and family for children who are not the best choice at the time of a pregnancy. Life is precious. As I look at my own family, from the life of my grandparents and parents who have since passed, to my elderly aunt with whom I currently live and care for, to my children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren, I feel blessed that each of their parents chose life. This experience has shaped my current position on life, which is respecting life from conception until natural death. I hope to see Kansans more often choose life for their unborn children. Our senior citizens are a precious asset. They are the reason we have the wealth that we have today. Many of our seniors are suffering because of the high cost of medications, property taxes, taxes on food, and other costs that can be eased by legislation. I want to see a Kansas of 2030 protecting this vulnerable population by finding ways to provide assistance during the latter years of their lives.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

It is my plan to lead my colleagues in establishing a greater arena for school choice including public charter schools that are independent of their district’s authority, and increasing use of vouchers and scholarships. This will encourage a healthy competitive environment and will move toward holding our schools accountable for educating our children. As State Representative, I will stand for legislation that supports life from conception to natural death. I will also support legislation to provide educational materials to individuals and families regarding the truth about the long-term impacts of abortion, and support legislation to expand the availability of imaging technology to expecting parents. As for our senior citizens and poor, I would introduce, co-sponsor, or support legislation to provide assistance with or reductions to the costs of their medications, capping their property taxes after a certain age, and eliminating any taxes on food at the grocery store.

Back to Top

District 38, Kansas House

Map of District

Stuart W. Sweeney (Democratic)
Willie Dove (Republican)

Back to Top

District 39, Kansas House

Map of District

Michael Bolton (Democratic)
Owen Donohoe (Republican)

Back to Top

District 40, Kansas House

Map of District

Debbie Deere (Democratic)
David W. French (Republican)

Back to Top

District 41, Kansas House

Map of District

Jeff Pittman (Democratic)
Tony Barton (Republican)

Back to Top

District 42, Kansas House

Map of District

Thea Perry (Democratic)
Jim Karleskint (Republican)

Back to Top

District 43, Kansas House

Map of District

Pamela Finley (Democratic)
Bill Sutton (Republican)

Back to Top

District 45, Kansas House

Map of District

Mike Amyx (Democratic)
Cynthia Smith (Republican)

Amyx’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

Mike Amyx. Democratic candidate for the 45th District of the Kansas House of Representatives. I am a life-long resident of Lawrence and I would like to translate my experience into an asset representing the 45th District in Topeka. I have very much enjoyed representing Lawrence area residents as a City Commissioner and County Commissioner for more than 2 decades.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

The #1 priority will be to concentrate on funding and furthering our education system, both K-12 and post secondary. We need to implement a long-term commitment to providing educational opportunities which will create a legacy we can be proud of. We also need to strive to better maintain our infrastructure, highways, bridges and technology. Our roads need to provide safe efficient transportation and our technology infrastructure should provide all Kansans broadband access to meet our future needs. And the provision of safe, adequate water supplies for the present and future Kansans is essential. These 3 items are essential to the future of Kansas.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

I would sponsor legislation to address the above concerns and work to create bi-partisan support for them. These issues should not be political, but all should work to create a safe and better future for all Kansans.

Back to Top

District 47, Kansas House

Map of District

George D. Hanna (Democratic)
Ronald B. Ellis (Republican)

Back to Top

District 48, Kansas House

Map of District

David L. Benson (Democratic)
Abraham Rafie (Republican)

Benson’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

David L Benson. A career educator, retired with 44 years of service in Kansas, Missouri and Iowa including 33 years as a Superintendent and 11 years in Blue Valley. Public service record as a Board member for local and regional United Ways, Chambers of Commerce and past President of Johnson County Community Services. I want to continue my life’s work as a public educator as a legislator. Kansas politicians have neglected our schools in favor of special interests. Our state infrastructure has been ignored and allowed to break down due to lack of investments. Our local governments have been assaulted with unnecessary and burdensome laws and regulations. Further, our economy has stagnated without proper state investments and our state health system for mental health and Medicaid routed to a shadow of essential services.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

I can be relied upon to: Support Great Public Schools Back Fair State Budget Priorities and Tax Policies Advocate for Local Control Champion Transparency in Government Support Infrastructure Investments Foster Bipartisan Solutions Through these activities Kansas will be better off in the future.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

I will reach across to my many Republican friends to help break the partisan divide that prevents common sense solutions to the state’s many issues. I am willing to work towards solutions with anyone who brings a earnest solution to the table. As a freshman legislator, I will be a seeker of information and an independent voice.

Back to Top

District 49, Kansas House

Map of District

Darnell W. Hunt (Democratic)
Megan Lynn (Republican)

Lynn’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

Megan Lynn I’m a wife and a mom of 3 who wants to see real results and solutions. I grew up on a small family farm and understand the importance of diligent work. I have degrees in both biology and political science.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

I would love to see permanent solution to school finance, tax system that is affordable and competitive, we have addressed mental health in comprehensive ways, and our foster care system is fixed and meeting the needs of children.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

I will be a consensus builder, and will listen to all stake holders who are serious about finding solutions on the above matters.

Back to Top

District 50, Kansas House

Map of District

Down River Dan Brennan (Democratic)
Fred C. Patton (Republican)

Back to Top

District 51, Kansas House

Map of District

Noah L. Wright (Democratic)
Ron Highland (Republican)

Back to Top

District 52, Kansas House

Map of District

Toni Scalia (Democratic)
Brenda S. Dietrich (Republican)

Scalia’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

I am a retired full professor of Sociology and Criminal Justice and published author.

Since the beginning of the Trump administration I have become increasingly aware of the damages he is inflicting on our Democracy at the federal level. I have also become aware that this is mirrored by the Republican led legislature at the state level. On the federal level, Trump has attacked the judiciary with multiple firings of law enforcement personnel; exhorted the US attorney general to cease charging members of the Republican party with crimes they have committed; and now, we see the selection of a nominee for the Supreme Court who has stated that it would be his decision that a sitting president is above the law. We, here in Kansas, have seen our legislature attempt to deny judicial review over our constitution regarding school funding; the attorney general of our state has joined a lawsuit aimed at taking away health care rather than provide it, and has attempted legislation to take away women’s health care as is currently guaranteed by the US constitution. Lastly, we have seen our legislature passing legislation that for the most part is not sponsored and employs the gut and go method of legislating.  I believe that the majority of our citizens are  unaware of these happenings and would be appalled at the degree to which we are losing our Democracy.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

I want Kansas to be not merely better in formed but to be proactively engaged and informed regarding the policies, legislation, and actions of every branch and department of Kansas government.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

I would establish quarterly bipartisan social media and actual Town Halls using a multi agency approach that engages clubs of all genres, religious organizations, public and private school organizations, and established social organizations. Social media quarterly meeting would be always available, as would videos of actual meetings. House Districts would provide the, ’neighborhood, grouping for citizen involvement with each district required to report on the information provided at the town halls as a test of their involvement. The District reporting with the greatest  degree of accuracy would receive a grant to apply as they  see fit. This concept is based on the Palio, a 60 second horse race held in Siena making that city the safest in all of Italy.

Back to Top

District 54, Kansas House

Map of District

Sarah Coats (Democratic)
Ken Corbet (Republican)

Coats’ Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

Sarah Coats. I am a social worker and a first time candidate for office. I entered this race because the legislature has failed to represent the needs and interests of working people like me and my neighbors. The incumbent in my district has long been a rubber stamp for his party’s leadership, and we deserve more than that.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

I want Kansas to be a safer state, and one with greater opportunities for people to earn living wages. With my experience with organized labor, and as a social worker, I know that I can influence the legislature to take the side of working Kansans, and to combat human trafficking and domestic violence.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

I have ideas for policies and programs that can bring our state in the direction I described above. I will take the lead on drafting legislation, and will recruit colleagues from across the state and both sides of the aisle to assist me.

Back to Top

District 56, Kansas House

Map of District

Virgil Weigel (Democratic)
Michael J. Snowden (Republican)

Snowden’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

My name is Michael Snowden and I am running for the Kansas House of Representatives in the 56th District. I will be an active voice for our district. I’ve grown up in Topeka, I went to school in Topeka, and I work in Topeka. I am passionate about our community, and believe it’s time for a change. I have been going door-to-door engaging with the people I want to serve and hear directly from you the voter. I want to help bring compassion and common sense to the Capitol.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

The legislature recently raised your taxes. I don’t think we need to raise taxes again. We must stop increasing sales and property taxes because this hurts hardworking families and people on fixed incomes, particularly our seniors. I will work eliminate the food sales tax. Removing the tax Kansans pay on food would be a benefit to seniors on fixed incomes. It is my sincere hope legislators will work together to put an end to the tax Kansans pay on groceries. I believe that this will help put more money into the pockets of every day Kansans and that as a result we will see numerous benefits over the years.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

I vow to work with both sides of the political aisle. I believe the best way to bring about lasting change is when legislation is passed on a bipartisan level. When both sides are willing to reach compromise for the betterment of our state. I hope to bring compassion and civility back to the legislature.

Back to Top

District 59, Kansas House

Map of District

John Hall (Democratic)
Blaine Finch (Republican)

Back to Top

District 62, Kansas House

Map of District

Melvin L. Baker (Democratic)
Randy Garber (Republican)

Back to Top

District 66, Kansas House

Map of District

Sydney Carlin (Democratic)
Edgar Chambers (Libertarian)

Back to Top

District 67, Kansas House

Map of District

Alex Van Dyke (Democratic)
Tom Phillips (Republican)

Van Dyke’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

My name is Alex Van Dyke. I’m running for office because I love this state. But I barely recognize it anymore, and I’m scared it will soon present more challenges than opportunities for my family and families like ours. This is why my platform focuses on essentials for all Kansas families. I thought about the kind of state I want my daughter to be raised in, and Kansas is not headed in that direction. That’s what made me decide to step up and lead our state into a future that works for all Kansans.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

By 2030, I want to see a Kansas that works for all Kansans. I want to see Medicaid expanded, education funded properly and expanded to include universal pre-K, the DCF fixed and running smoothly, equal pay and anti-discrimination laws expanded, and a tax system that properly spreads the burden of paying our state’s bills. Kansas will be properly funded and thriving with new businesses, high labor participation, and families moving into the state again.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

As soon as the session begins, I will be part of the efforts to get a Medicaid expansion bill passed. I also will be part of the efforts to properly fund our education, including spearheading the efforts to expand it to include universal pre-K. I will bring about the economic outcomes by gathering and meeting with local business leaders across the state to see how we can best help them add jobs and expand our workforce. I will draft legislation to incentivise green energy and technology jobs in our state. I will work with both parties to draft legislation to improve our current anti-discrimination and equal pay laws to ensure no demographic is discriminated against in our state.

Back to Top

District 69, Kansas House

Map of District

Gerrett Morris (Democratic)
J.R. Claeys (Republican)

Back to Top

District 70, Kansas House

Map of District

Jo Schwartz (Democratic)
John E Barker (Republican)

Back to Top

District 72, Kansas House

Map of District

Tim Hodge (Democratic)
Steve G. Kelly (Republican)

Back to Top

District 78, Kansas House

Map of District

Jason K Darby (Democratic)
Ron Ryckman (Republican)

Back to Top

District 79, Kansas House

Map of District

Ed Trimmer (Democratic)
Cheryl Helmer (Republican)

Back to Top

District 81, Kansas House

Map of District

Shala Perez (Democratic)
Blake Carpenter (Republican)

Back to Top

District 82, Kansas House

Map of District

Danette Harris (Democratic)
Jesse Burris (Republican)

Back to Top

District 83, Kansas House

Map of District

Henry Helgerson (Democratic)
David J. Robbins (Republican)

Back to Top

District 85, Kansas House

Map of District

Monica Marks (Democratic)
Michael Capps (Republican)

Back to Top

District 86, Kansas House

Map of District

Jim Ward (Democratic)
Jim Price (Republican)

Back to Top

District 91, Kansas House

Map of District

Emil M. Bergquist (Republican)
David Loomis (Libertarian)

Back to Top

District 93, Kansas House

Map of District

Clifton Beck (Democratic)
J.C. Moore (Republican)

Back to Top

District 94, Kansas House

Map of District

Dan Stiffler (Democratic)
Leo G. Delperdang (Republican)

Back to Top

District 97, Kansas House

Map of District

Rebecca Jenek (Democratic)
Nick J. Hoheisel (Republican)

Back to Top

District 98, Kansas House

Map of District

Steven G. Crum (Democratic)
Ron Howard (Republican)

Back to Top

District 99, Kansas House

Map of District

Kristi Kirk (Democratic)
Susan Humphries (Republican)

Kirk’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

Kristi Kirk, candidate for HD 99 in East Wichita, Andover, and rural Butler County, is a Derby High School special education teacher. Kirk’s career background includes teaching in both private and public schools. She has also worked for non-profit agencies and for community relations for a Chamber of Commerce and the Department of Economic Development under the Gov. Mike Huckabee administration. Her husband, Lance, works in finance at Spirit AeroSystems. Together, they have five adult children. One son is currently deployed with the United State Navy. Kristi decided to run for office when she realized that the incumbent stood by Brownback’s Failed Tax Experiment even after it was roundly determined to be a failure and devastating to our public schools and state economy. Kristi wants to go to Topeka in order to act on her District’s values and to help get public school funding back on track because she knows when communities provide a quality public education for their kids, they also enjoy an enriched quality of life within their neighborhoods that help the area and state economy.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

Kristi is a forward thinker. She wants Kansas to continue into the future providing kids with the ever-changing technology and learning experiences that challenge them academically and prepares them for opportunities that allow them to live independently and choose to stay in Kansas to enjoy their success in life and start a family if they wish.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

Kristi will work across the aisle to support the restoration of funding back to the public schools.

Back to Top

District 100, Kansas House

Map of District

Jennifer Winn (Democratic)
Dan Hawkins (Republican)

Winn’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

My name is Jennifer Winn. I am a small business owner running for office to represent people not corporations. For far too long the will and voice of the people have been ignored and I intend to change that.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

By listening to the taxpayers and actually working to improve their lives, not the lives of corporate donors.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

I plan to be part of my constituents’ lives and understand the everyday problems they face.  Spending time in our schools, workplace and community events allows the ability to understand the daily struggles and address the issues that are negatively affecting lives.

Back to Top

District 107, Kansas House

Map of District

Susan L Concannon (Republican)
Bryan Bombardier (Libertarian)

Back to Top

District 110, Kansas House

Map of District

Kim Thomas (Democratic)
Ken Rahjes (Republican)

Back to Top

District 111, Kansas House

Map of District

Eber Phelps (Democratic)
Barbara K. Wasinger (Republican)

Back to Top

District 113, Kansas House

Map of District

David W. Curtis (Democratic)
Greg Lewis (Republican)

Curtis’ Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

David Curtis. I found a need to bring our schools back to levels of excellence we expect. We need for government to once again be for, by and about someone other than politicians. Expansion of medicaid to encompass and protect our citizens.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

I want our schools to once again recognized as among the best in the country. Our infrastructure to be unsurpassed and meet the needs of all in our state. A state government the is transparent and works for everyone. A healthcare system that works for all Kansans.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

I find the need for pushing these ideals to forefront of any legislative agenda.

Back to Top

District 114, Kansas House

Map of District

Shanna Henry (Democratic)
Jack Thimesch (Republican)

Henry’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

I am Shanna Henry, 1st time candidate for State Representative, 114th District. This includes all of Kingman Co. and parts of Reno and Rice Counties. I’m a native Kansan, from a 4th generation Kansas farm family in McPherson County. Our family has resided in Kingman County and this district for almost 24 years. I currently serve as Chair of the Kingman County Economic Development Council and on the board of the Kingman County Extension Council. I have a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration and have had careers in Telecommunications and Renewable Energy. I have also served countless hours as a volunteer for schools, PTA groups, non-profit organizations, community fundraisers and as a 4-H Club Leader and 4-H Council Leader.

I love my home state, but I am very concerned about the future of Kansas. It does not hold the same opportunities that I took for granted when I was growing up. I was educated in a top notch public school system in McPherson. I had plentiful job opportunities upon graduating from college. But I don’t see the same possibilities for our children to stay in Kansas and raise their families. I have also met many people on the campaign trail that feel the same way, some even stating that they are planning to move out of Kansas to states with better opportunities. I am saddened every time I hear this and want to do everything I can to make this a place that our children and grandchildren are proud to call home. I am ready for a life of public service and giving back to my community and my state. I am “Sowing Seeds for a Better Kansas”.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

By 2030, I expect to see access to affordable health care for all Kansans and the preservation of rural and community hospitals and healthcare services. I also want to see much improved and expanded rural broadband infrastructure so that our rural communities can survive and grow in this new economy. In addition, I anticipate the full funding of our public education system so that our students can learn and thrive in higher education or whatever career path they choose. Education is the foundation for our kids’ future and our state’s future and is absolutely essential for the health and vitality of our Kansas economy.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

Regarding our healthcare system, I will absolutely advocate for KanCare Expansion and will vote in favor of returning our federal taxpayer dollars back to Kansas. This is a no-brainer in my opinion and in the factual analysis of groups like “Alliance For A Healthy Kansas”. Imagine what a cost-effective and robust health care system we would have in Kansas if we had the over $2.8 billion Kansas taxpayer dollars that we have lost since 2014 while we waited for expansion! This is critically important in rural districts like Kingman Co. where we passed a 3/4% sales tax for the next 20 years to keep our hospital open. Expanding KanCare is a fiscally responsible Kansas-based solution. With regard to education, we need to prepare Kansas children to be life-long learners so they can adapt to the fast-paced changes in our economy and our workforce. This issue is near and dear to my heart. I have already been a volunteer leader in education and would continue to be a leader by introducing and/or supporting legislation in the Kansas House, initiating policy to effect real change. The success of our Kansas economy and jobs are completely intertwined with our education systems, from Pre-K through the community college and university levels. We must rethink job retraining for the age of disruption. There aren’t going to be life-long jobs anymore and we shouldn’t be fooling ourselves about this matter. Politicians shouldn’t be lying about how they are going to protect peoples’ jobs forever. We should be thinking about how we can get people back to work and meaningful employment. Policy should not be right vs. left, but past vs. future. I will work hard to promote policy that will make our state a better place for ALL Kansans!

Back to Top

District 120, Kansas House

Map of District

Jerry Hill (Democratic)
Adam Smith (Republican)

Hill’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

Jerry Hill, candidate for the KS120. I am a farmer in Sheridan County, residing in Thomas County. I am running so that voters can have an option to express their dissent about the direction Kansas is currently taking.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

We should be using much more renewable energy. Air and water should be no less clean than now. Schools need to maintain and improve education and opportunities. Healthcare needs to be maintained and improved particularly in smaller rural areas. Technology must serve all Kansans as well as it does larger urban centers. All Kansans should earn a living wage by increasing the minimum wage to a higher level through new and better paying jobs.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

I have no grand plan to equalize our mostly rural state with the major population centers on the coasts. I will do my best to see that Kansas isn’t deprived of the opportunities that more urban states enjoy. But I hope to maintain rural advantages of clean air, water, a good education, a good economy and a less hectic lifestyle.

District 121, Kansas House

Map of District

Nick Gill (Democratic)
John Resman (Republican)

Gill’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

Nick Gill – I’m a 34 year old, married father of two young children. I received my schooling in science, earning a MS in biochemistry from USML, and use a scientist’s approach to problems: researching the problem, looking for evidence, and drawing conclusions from the available information. I decided to run for KS HD 121 because I didn’t like the way that my state representative was handling problems in the state, especially economic-based issues.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

If elected, I want the state to have tax system more friendly to wage labor, to have a medical system that is more available and cheaper to its citizens, and an education system that is funded at a level at least equal to what I enjoyed when I was going to public school in Kansas.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

As 1 of 125 legislators, to reach my goals it will be important to use my position to advertise my views in the press, to co-sponsor legislation when it shares my vision for Kansas, and use the amendment process to alter advancing legislation to bend it towards the goals I desire for Kansas.

District 123, Kansas House

Map of District

Pedro Rodriguez (Democratic)
John P. Wheeler Jr. (Republican)

Back to Top

Candidates Running Unopposed Who Completed The Journal’s Survey

District 13, Kansas House

Larry P. Hibbard (Republican)
Hibbard’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

Larry Hibbard I have been in the House for six years and feel we have started making Kansas better and would like to see us continue on that road.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

Have top quality schools, have fewer people on public assistance, maintain our good road system. and make Kansas a place business want to come to.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

My six years of experience will help as we work through the committee process preparing bills. I have the ability to speak and have my ideas heard by the body.

Back to Top

District 68, Kansas House

Dave Baker (Republican)
Baker’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

I’m running for office to represent District 68 and the business community.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

I want more Kansans to have a better life.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

I have owned my own business for 43 years and understand what it takes to grow Kansas. We have assets that are not being promoted and I want to help lead in unlocking their value. The goal is to become a destination state for everyone.

Back to Top

District 71, Kansas House

Diana Dierks (Republican)
Dierks’ Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

Diana Dierks. This will be my fourth term serving my constituents. The importance of passing legislation that supports adequate funding for education is very imporant.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

What we decide today and future years will determine what effect it will have on education, services for our elderly and economic impact on our citizens.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

I am hopeful to be placed on communities where my input will have an impact in getting good legislation to the house floor.

Back to Top

District 88, Kansas House

Elizabeth Bishop (Democratic)
Bishop’s Responses to Questions from The Journal

1. Please provide your name, a brief introduction, and description of why you are running for office.

Elizabeth Bishop – Kansas Representative – District 88. I spent my career working in government service (aide to congressman, to city manager, Sedgwick County Department on Aging Assistant Director) working to connect citizens with their government. As Kansas Representative, I will work collaboratively with constituents to inform and engage them regarding state issues.

2. Should you be elected in 2018, how do you want Kansas to be better off in 2030 as a result of your service?

In 2030 we will have a balanced system of revenue sources; no tax on food; adequate funding and services for those suffering from mental illness and/o addictions; healthcare for low-income Kansans; funding for a quality foster care program, and help for children suffering in dysfunctional families; quality education for Kansas school children; and good higher education and workforce programs to prepare workers for the 21st Century.

3. In what ways do you plan to exercise leadership to bring about the outcomes described above?

I study the bills carefully, ask relevant questions, and provide input (amendments, opinion, etc.) only when it helps constructively. I reach out to local groups, agencies, and individuals to learn the street-level view of problems, possible solutions, and the impact of laws. For example, working with the South Central Kansas Task Force on the mentally ill.

Back to Top

Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial